<![CDATA[Nothing To Say Here - Dave\'s Movie Reviews]]>Wed, 20 Nov 2019 21:34:21 -0500Weebly<![CDATA[Premieres 2019: November 22 - November 28]]>Thu, 21 Nov 2019 05:00:00 GMThttp://nothingtosayhere.com/daves-movie-reviews/premieres-2019-november-22-november-28
By Dave B.
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"Premieres" will feature official trailers and synopses from what I feel looks like the most interesting (or the only, in some cases) original programming coming out in the subsequent week on Hulu, Amazon Prime, Netflix, and elsewhere. In no way to these previews represent recommendations or reviews. My intent is to post this segment each Thursday or Friday, but we'll see. Enjoy!
The Dragon Prince: Season Three - Netflix, November 22
Synopsis:
​"The saga continues! Callum and Rayla finally enter the magical land of Xadia and begin the last, most dangerous leg of their journey to reunite Zym with his mother, The Dragon Queen. Ezran returns to the kingdom of Katolis to take his place on the throne, only to be immediately pressured to go to war with Xadia. Meanwhile, Lord Viren, imprisoned and desperate, begins to realize the power of his new ally – the mysterious Startouch elf, Aaravos."
Frozen 2 - In Theaters, November 22
Synopsis:
​"
Why was Elsa born with magical powers? The answer is calling her and threatening her kingdom. Together with Anna, Kristoff, Olaf and Sven, she’ll set out on a dangerous but remarkable journey. In “Frozen,” Elsa feared her powers were too much for the world. In “Frozen 2,” she must hope they are enough."
A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood - In Theaters, November 22
Synopsis:
​"
Tom Hanks portrays Mister Rogers in A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood, a timely story of kindness triumphing over cynicism, based on the true story of a real-life friendship between Fred Rogers and journalist Tom Junod. After a jaded magazine writer (Emmy winner Matthew Rhys) is assigned a profile of Fred Rogers, he overcomes his skepticism, learning about kindness, love and forgiveness from America’s most beloved neighbor."
Queen & Slim - In Theaters, November 27
Synopsis:
​"
While on a forgettable first date together in Ohio, a black man (Get Out’s Daniel Kaluuya) and a black woman (Jodie Turner-Smith, in her first starring feature-film role), are pulled over for a minor traffic infraction. The situation escalates, with sudden and tragic results, when the man kills the police officer in self-defense. Terrified and in fear for their lives, the man, a retail employee, and the woman, a criminal defense lawyer, are forced to go on the run. But the incident is captured on video and goes viral, and the couple unwittingly become a symbol of trauma, terror, grief and pain for people across the country.
As they drive, these two unlikely fugitives will discover themselves and each other in the most dire and desperate of circumstances, and will forge a deep and powerful love that will reveal their shared humanity and shape the rest of their lives."
Knives Out - In Theaters, November 27
Synopsis:
​"
Acclaimed writer and director Rian Johnson (Brick, Looper, The Last Jedi) pays tribute to mystery mastermind Agatha Christie in KNIVES OUT, a fun, modern-day murder mystery where everyone is a suspect. When renowned crime novelist Harlan Thrombey (Christopher Plummer) is found dead at his estate just after his 85th birthday, the inquisitive and debonair Detective Benoit Blanc (Daniel Craig) is mysteriously enlisted to investigate. From Harlan’s dysfunctional family to his devoted staff, Blanc sifts through a web of red herrings and self-serving lies to uncover the truth behind Harlan’s untimely death. With an all-star ensemble cast including Chris Evans, Ana De Armas, Jamie Lee Curtis, Don Johnson, Michael Shannon, Toni Collette, LaKeith Stanfield, Katherine Langford and Jaeden Martell, KNIVES OUT is a witty and stylish whodunit guaranteed to keep audiences guessing until the very end."
The Irishman - Netflix, November 27
Synopsis:
​"
Robert De Niro, Al Pacino and Joe Pesci star in Martin Scorsese’s THE IRISHMAN, an epic saga of organized crime in post-war America told through the eyes of World War II veteran Frank Sheeran, a hustler and hitman who worked alongside some of the most notorious figures of the 20th century. Spanning decades, the film chronicles one of the greatest unsolved mysteries in American history, the disappearance of legendary union boss Jimmy Hoffa, and offers a monumental journey through the hidden corridors of organized crime: its inner workings, rivalries and connections to mainstream politics."
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<![CDATA[Review of The Man in the High Castle: Season Four]]>Mon, 18 Nov 2019 05:00:00 GMThttp://nothingtosayhere.com/daves-movie-reviews/review-of-the-man-in-the-high-castle-season-four
By Dave B.
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The fourth and final season of Amazon’s The Man in the High Castle finds the world on the brink of chaos as rebels in Japanese-held territories are bleeding the empire dry, and the Nazis strive for ultimate power over not just their empire and the territories of a crumbling Japan, but also over the multiverse itself. As rebels across the former United States prepare for their last stand, all hope for freedom rests on a pivotal showdown between the powerful, but embattled Reichsmarschal Smith, and the universe-hopping rebel Juliana Crain.
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Well, the end of one of the most interesting shows on television is finally here. Unlike Season Three of The Man in the High Castle, Season Four does absolutely require having seen previous episodes to understand what is going on. This season of the show maintains the impressive strategic world-building of previous seasons and the action sequences are well-choreographed. As a whole, all of the 10 episodes are well-directed, with some truly impressive CGI and battle sequences. As a whole, Season Four is probably more purely entertaining and well-paced than any previous season. And the introduction of the Black Communist Rebellion is a welcome addition to the show, as previous seasons pretty much relegated non-white, non-Japanese characters to the background, despite the obvious impact that rule under Nazis and the Japanese Empire would have on other peoples.
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Despite it’s entertainment value, this season of The Man in the High Castle begins to feel a bit…off, as it progresses. Ending a show in a way that is satisfying to fans can be difficult and I give credit to the showrunners for their attempt to tie many disparate plot threads together into a sensical ending, but this is the type of show where viewers want/need some sort of emotional catharsis with individual characters that they’ve been following since the show’s inception, and frankly, there just isn’t much of that. Further, ultimately, this season’s overarching point seems to boil down to “Nazis are bad and need to be fought no matter the cost”. While this is clearly true, it doesn’t say anything particularly new or more interesting than what the show has said in previous seasons. 
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As far as final seasons go, Season Four of The Man in the High Castle is solid. And solid endings are fine. It’s just that good endings are obviously better and The Man in the High Castle doesn’t quite deliver that. It’s a fun ride, and I personally like the show, but ultimately, this final season cements my belief that the entire series is slightly more fluff than substance. If you’ve watched the previous seasons, obviously you’ll want to see how it concludes, and I think you won’t be overly disappointed. If you’ve never seen any episode of this show, check it out if you’re a fan of alternate history and political maneuverings. But if you’re looking for a show that makes a larger point about the human condition, you have better alternatives available to you.
Rating: 6.5/10
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<![CDATA[Review of The End of The F***ing World: Season Two]]>Sat, 16 Nov 2019 05:00:00 GMThttp://nothingtosayhere.com/daves-movie-reviews/review-of-the-end-of-the-fing-world-season-two
By Dave B.
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​The second season of The End of The F***ing World (Netflix) takes place about two years after the dramatic conclusion of Season One. James and Alyssa have not seen each other since the culmination of their adventure. Alyssa (Jessica Barden) is engaged to be married and James (Alex Lawther) is recovering from partial paralysis and the loss of his father. But fate is not done with these two yet, as the first season’s most pivotal event comes back to haunt them in the form of Bonnie (Wunmi Mosaku), a deeply disturbed foe with an implacable grudge against the two teens.
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First of all, watching Season One of The End of The F***ing World is a prerequisite for understanding anything that happens in this season. Season Two largely revolves around how James and Alyssa’s journey has impacted each of them individually and how they are managing to cope with (or failing to cope with) their respective traumas. That said, Season Two is a masterpiece. It’s one of the most well-directed shows that I have ever seen. The score, lighting, shot selection…all the technical components that a director uses to set a tone, are executed to near-perfection. The show is filled with darkly humorous situations and dialogue. And overall, the performances are excellent: Barden is masterful, Mosaku is great, and Lawther is solid, if unspectacular. I watched the first episode of The End of The F***ing World’s eight episode season at about midnight on a Tuesday, I figured that since each episode is only about 20 minutes long, I could watch one episode, go to sleep, and watch the remaining episodes over the next day or two. Instead, I ended up watching the entire thing in one sitting, due in large part to the show’s ability to skillfully manipulate my emotions in nearly every scene.
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​As I previously alluded to, The End of The F***ing World’s second season is about broken people trying to do the best that they can to find some peace in the world. And where it’s greatest success lies, is in forcing viewers to have empathy for these deeply flawed people. Through a combination of wry humor and unbelievably good character development, The End of The F***ing World makes all of its main characters fully three-dimensional people who we viewers want things to work out for, despite the horrible things that they may have done or experienced. 
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I had assumed that I would go through 2019 without giving a perfect score to any show or movie (unlike in 2018, when I gave that rating to two shows), despite how impressed I was with “Spider-Man: Into The Spider-Verse”. I was wrong. To be honest, I enjoyed the first season of this show a bit more than the second. It was more of a surprise to me that it was as good as it was. But what sets Season Two apart is that, although I didn’t realize it until the final credits were rolling, once it was over, I realized that this sequel season was exactly what I wanted and needed it to be. The End of The F***ing World: Season Two is undoubtedly my favorite show of the year (thus far), and I highly recommend it to anyone. No caveats, no exceptions. Watch this show. 
Rating: 10/10
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<![CDATA[Premieres 2019: November 15 - November 21]]>Thu, 14 Nov 2019 05:00:00 GMThttp://nothingtosayhere.com/daves-movie-reviews/premieres-2019-november-15-november-21
By Dave B.
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"Premieres" will feature official trailers and synopses from what I feel looks like the most interesting (or the only, in some cases) original programming coming out in the subsequent week on Hulu, Amazon Prime, Netflix, and elsewhere. In no way to these previews represent recommendations or reviews. My intent is to post this segment each Thursday or Friday, but we'll see. Enjoy!
The Man in the High Castle: Season Four - Amazon Prime, November 15
Synopsis:
​"
The final season of The Man in the High Castle will be rocked by war and revolution. The Resistance becomes a full-blown rebellion, driven by Juliana Crain's (Alexa Davalos) visions of a better world. A new Black insurgent movement emerges to fight the forces of Nazism and imperialism. As empires teeter, Chief Inspector Takeshi Kido (Joel De La Fuente) will find himself torn between his duty to his country and the bonds of family. Meanwhile, Reichsmarschall John Smith (Rufus Sewell) will be drawn towards the portal the Nazis have built to another universe, and the tantalizing possibility of stepping through a gateway to the path not taken."
White Snake - In Theaters, November 15
Synopsis:
​"
From Light Chaser Animation, one of China’s premiere animation studios, comes a visually stunning new take on a classic legend. One day a young woman named Blanca is saved by Xuan, a snake catcher from a nearby village. She has lost her memory, and together they go on a journey to discover her real identity, developing deeper feelings for one another along the way. But as they learn more about her past, they uncover a darker plot of supernatural forces vying for power, with the fate of the world hanging in the balance. Conceived as a prequel to one of the most ancient and enduring stories in Chinese history, White Snake presents a sumptuous tale of trickster demons, deadly mythical beasts, assassins, wuxia action, and the promise of eternal love."
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<![CDATA[Review of Disney Plus]]>Wed, 13 Nov 2019 05:00:00 GMThttp://nothingtosayhere.com/daves-movie-reviews/review-of-disney-plus
By Dave B.
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​Disney Plus is finally here. But is it any good? Is it worth replacing Netflix? What audiences will benefit the most from the new streaming platform? Well, I’m going to answer those questions (and more) for you as quickly and efficiently as possible.
Is Disney Plus Good?
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That depends upon your definition of “good”. The user interface is solid and will be familiar to users of Netflix. One positive feature is that it doesn’t start playing a movie while you’re still deciding if you want to watch it or not. That always annoys the hell out of me. Content on the platform is divided into Disney’s main properties: Disney, Pixar, Marvel, Star Wars, and National Geographic, as well as categories such as “Movies”, “Series”, and “Originals”. These are obviously logical groupings and it’s very easy to find what you want, even without using the search function. Unsurprisingly, the app is still very buggy. I had to restart it a few times in order to watch the first episode of The Mandalorian. Annoying, yes, but problems on Day One are to be expected. More disappointing is that Disney rolled out the platform with a very limited slate of Original programming. 12 programs, to be exact. And of those 12, only the Mandalorian really caught my interest. 
Is Disney Plus Better Than Netflix?
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In short, no. But it might be better to say “not yet”. Netflix has thousands of hours of original content in many different languages, across many different genres. Even Disney’s huge content library can’t really compete with that. However, to be fair, Disney isn’t trying to offer the breadth of content that Netflix has. It’s trying to cash in on its most popular properties by offering them exclusively through its own platform and I think that it will largely be successful at that. Given enough time, Disney will certainly offer a plethora of original programs that will appeal to diverse audiences. But we’re likely talking years down the road, not weeks or months. So, for someone like me who likes to see new, original programming, Disney Plus is more of a complimentary service to Netflix, instead of an outright replacement and if I had to choose one over the other, I would stick with Netflix. For now. 
Which Viewers Get the Most Out of Disney Plus?
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The most obvious answer is: families with younger children. Despite my long-held belief that children should be discouraged from watching Disney movies, I understand that pretty much nobody is going to follow that advice, and Disney Plus contains nearly the entirety of Disney’s content library. If you need to entertain your kid, this is the most complete one-stop shop that you could hope for. It’s also a must-have for fans of Marvel and/or Star Wars as it includes nearly all of the Disney-owned content from those franchises. Like the animated Star Wars series’? They’re all there. Fan of Agent Carter? Yes, its there too. And even if someone is not interested in Disney’s mass-market entertainment offerings, the inclusion of National Geographic on the platform means that pretty much any person with access to viewing technology and a broadband connection can see something of interest to them, so long as they don’t mind it being something that they have probably seen before. However, one thing that REALLY annoys me about the platform is Disney’s decision to release new episodes for all of its original programs on a weekly basis. Yes, this helps reduce subscriber churn (which is good for the company), but one of the benefits of streaming (for viewers) is that when all episodes are released at once, you can watch them at whatever pace you choose. One could still do that by only paying for the Disney Plus service once the full season of whatever show you want to watch is complete, but that’s inconvenient (for me personally) so I’ll just quietly resent Disney a bit (forever) for their episode release decision. 
If I Already Have Hulu (or ESPN Plus), How Does the Bundle Work?
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​If you already have Hulu, they’ll credit your account at the base, ad-supported rate. For example, I have ad-free Hulu. So Disney will credit my Disney Plus bill for $5.99 per month (the cost of ad-supported Hulu), meaning that I’ll end up paying about $8.00 per month to gain access to both Disney Plus and ESPN Plus. I’ll continue to be billed separately for ad-free Hulu at the rate that I was previously paying. All in all, this is an elegant solution. My main problem with it being that it’s questionable if the combination of Disney Plus and ESPN Plus is worth $8.00 per month to me. 
In Short...
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​Disney Plus is a solid, but not spectacular, new streaming service. If you ask me if it’s worth buying now, my answer would be a reluctant “no”. At least not for someone who does not have children and who is interested in original programming. A year from now, my opinion will likely be different and two years from now, it certainly will be. That said, I can never see it having the diversity of programming that would enable me to only have it (and ESPN Plus and Hulu) to the exclusion of other streaming platforms. In other words, I see it more as a welcome add-on than as a core holding. 
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<![CDATA[Review of Daybreak]]>Mon, 11 Nov 2019 05:00:00 GMThttp://nothingtosayhere.com/daves-movie-reviews/review-of-daybreak
By Dave B.
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Daybreak (Netflix) takes place six months after a chemical/nuclear/biological attack on Los Angeles has turned all adults into flesh-eating monsters, incapable of higher thought and animals have been mutated in freakish versions of their former selves. The various high-school cliques in the area have carved out their own fiefdoms. Josh, the “main” protagonist of the show, is on a quest to find his lost love and has concluded that doing so on his own is the best way to proceed. However, after teeming up with a pacifist samurai and a young pyro, Josh finds himself thrust into a power struggle that will determine if humanity will have any sort of future. 
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​Frankly, Daybreak is a weird show. Not weird in the sense that it’s incomprehensible. Weird in the sense that it’s difficult to determine who the show’s target audience really is. Clearly, the show is intended for a teenage audience, as it focuses on many issues that people that age face in America. But the adult language in the show (especially the foul-mouthed and funny 10 year old genius/firebug, Angelica) make this show more appropriate for adults. The show often vacillates between being humorous and touching, but in unexpected ways and at seemingly random times. That’s not a necessarily a negative quality, but it makes it difficult to emotionally invest in the character’s relationships, at times. Daybreak also has some odd choices in tone. For example, it relentlessly skewers excessive political correctness, while at the same time wholeheartedly embracing and promoting these excesses. It’s difficult to know what this show’s larger message is, or if it has a larger message at all.
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Daybreak works best when it’s four primary characters are onscreen together. They have a lot of chemistry that feeds the genuine, if inconsistent, humor that pervades the show. Unfortunately, there is a stretch of about three episodes in the 10 episode series where the group is separated and those episodes are of obviously lower entertainment appeal than other episodes. Daybreak has surprisingly robust and interesting world-building and both primary and secondary characters are generally likeable. But the show’s plot has difficulty maintaining it’s focus both within episodes and throughout the season. It has stretches that seem more like they serve to fill an episode’s 45 minute runtime, than to add to the relatively interesting story.
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In short, Daybreak is interesting and entertaining at times, but wildly inconsistent in plot and tone which means that it’s quality is variable throughout the season. I wouldn’t describe it as particularly original in any way, but it’s humor and execution are odd enough that I can say that I’ve never seen anything quite like it either. I’m tentatively recommending Daybreak, but only for those who are fans of both weirdness (generally), and creative storytelling execution (more specifically). If the show gets a second season, I’ll check it out, but it won’t be on my must-watch list. 
Rating: 6/10
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<![CDATA[Premieres 2019: November 8 - November 14]]>Thu, 07 Nov 2019 05:00:00 GMThttp://nothingtosayhere.com/daves-movie-reviews/premieres-2019-november-8-november-14
By Dave B.
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"Premieres" will feature official trailers and synopses from what I feel looks like the most interesting (or the only, in some cases) original programming coming out in the subsequent week on Hulu, Amazon Prime, Netflix, and elsewhere. In no way to these previews represent recommendations or reviews. My intent is to post this segment each Thursday or Friday, but we'll see. Enjoy!
​​One Child Nation- Amazon Prime, November 8
Synopsis:
​"
China’s One Child Policy, the extreme population control measure that made it illegal for couples to have more than one child, may have ended in 2015, but the process of dealing with the trauma of its brutal enforcement is only just beginning. From award-winning documentarian Nanfu Wang (Hooligan Sparrow, I Am Another You) and Jialing Zhang, the sweeping One Child Nation explores the ripple effect of this devastating social experiment, uncovering one shocking human rights violation after another – from abandoned newborns, to forced sterilizations and abortions, and government abductions. Wang digs fearlessly into her own personal life, weaving her experience as a new mother and the firsthand accounts of her family members into archival propaganda material and testimony from victims and perpetrators alike, yielding a revelatory and essential record of this chilling, unprecedented moment in human civilization."
Mickey and the Bear- In Theaters, November 14
Synopsis:
​"
Faced with the responsibility to take care of her opioid-addicted veteran father, headstrong teen Mickey Peck does what she can to keep her household afloat. When she receives the opportunity to leave her home for good, she must make the impossible decision between familial obligation and personal fulfillment."
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<![CDATA[Review of Tom Clancy’s Jack Ryan: Season Two]]>Mon, 04 Nov 2019 05:00:00 GMThttp://nothingtosayhere.com/daves-movie-reviews/review-of-tom-clancys-jack-ryan-season-two
By Dave B.
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​In Season Two of Jack Ryan (Amazon Prime), the titular hero is out for revenge. Determined to bring to justice a vicious killer, Ryan uncovers a global conspiracy that takes him from Venezuela, to London, and to the very halls of American power. As Ryan races against the clock to save a friend, he finds himself embroiled in an election that will determine the fate of a beleaguered people, and possibly, the world.
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​In my review of Jack Ryan: Season One, my chief complaint about the show was that Jack Ryan is a fundamentally boring character. My chief complaint with Season Two is that there’s absolutely nothing original about the plot, nor the action. If you have ever seen any action/espionage film, you’ll know exactly what’s going to happen in nearly every scene of this show. It’s basically a two-hour, average-at-best film, stretched to nearly eight hours. And because of how predictable the show is, Jack Ryan  lacks any compelling emotional component. All things being equal, Jack Ryan: Season Two is inferior to its preceding season. But…
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​All things are not equal. Two things stand out to make this season more than simply mundane garbage. The first is that, from a technical perspective, the show is well-crafted. The cinematography is better than good (although less than great), with eye-catching shots that do a good job of grabbing and holding viewers’ attention. The second, and more important, aspect of this show that elevates it is the cast. The acting is consistently good across the board. This is especially true for the criminally underused Noomi Rapace who is, once again, fantastic. I’ve made no secret that she is one of my favorite actresses and she significantly improves every single scene that she’s in during Season Two. Unfortunately, despite a relatively important role, her character isn’t central enough to the story, so her screen time is limited. 
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Overall, Jack Ryan: Season Two is watchable, even bingeable, to a degree. It’s slightly too entertaining to be considered bad, but it’s also much, much too predictable to be considered even remotely good, therefore I can’t recommend it. But I also won’t attempt to actively dissuade people from watching it. If you’re a fan of Rapace, you’ll enjoy seeing her performance. And highlighting the plight of Venezuelans (even one’s in a highly fictional situation) is a plus. But for most people, there are better ways to spend your time than watching the eight-episode second season of Jack Ryan
Rating: 5.5/10
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<![CDATA[Review of RWBY: Season 6]]>Sat, 02 Nov 2019 04:00:00 GMThttp://nothingtosayhere.com/daves-movie-reviews/review-of-rwby-season-6
By Dave B.
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In Season 6 of Rooster Teeth’s RWBY (2018, currently on Amazon Prime), on the world of Remnant, four young heroines find themselves at a crossroads after discovering the truth behind the origins of both their most fearsome enemy and their most powerful ally. Team RWBY must confront some terrible truths and their own demons, to find the will to continue the fight against the evil that is consuming their world. 
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If you’ve never seen RWBY, you’ve been missing out. Its innovative animation and storytelling are top-notch and Season 6 continues that trend. Centering around the geopolitical situation on a world where there are two races and many rival nations trying to maintain a fragile peace, creatures known as Grimm are a constant threat to all, as they are drawn to negative emotions and attack people ruthlessly whenever they encounter them. The previous five seasons have largely focused on character development and combating immediate threats. Season 6 delves deeper into the nature  and origin of those threats, and frankly, the battle that team RWBY is fighting is far older and daunting than any fan of the show is likely to have imagined.
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RWBY combines stunning animation, brilliant fight scenes, frequent action, and characters with serious depth to create what is the best American-created anime ever. Bar none. Admittedly, Season 6 is a bit lighter on the action than some previous seasons, but depth of the storytelling in this season is unparalleled and more than makes up for a slightly slower pace than fans may be accustomed to. 
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Put simply, RWBY is must-watch tv in general, and there’s nothing about Season 6 that makes that any less true. Fans of the show will enjoy Season 6’s 199 minutes of fantastic entertainment and will almost certainly be excited to see Season 7 of this brilliant show (Premiering on November 2, 2019). And newcomers to the world of RWBY should definitely start at Season 1 and work their way up to the current season. I absolutely, positively promise, with no reservations at all, that you will not regret doing so. 
Rating: 8.5/10
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<![CDATA[Premieres 2019: November 1 - November 7]]>Thu, 31 Oct 2019 04:00:00 GMThttp://nothingtosayhere.com/daves-movie-reviews/premieres-2019-november-1-november-7
By Dave B.
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"Premieres" will feature official trailers and synopses from what I feel looks like the most interesting (or the only, in some cases) original programming coming out in the subsequent week on Hulu, Amazon Prime, Netflix, and elsewhere. In no way to these previews represent recommendations or reviews. My intent is to post this segment each Thursday or Friday, but we'll see. Enjoy!
The King- Netflix, November 1
Synopsis:
​"
Hal (Timothée Chalamet), wayward prince and reluctant heir to the English throne, has turned his back on royal life and is living among the people. But when his tyrannical father dies, Hal is crowned King Henry V and is forced to embrace the life he had previously tried to escape. Now the young king must navigate the palace politics, chaos and war his father left behind, and the emotional strings of his past life — including his relationship with his closest friend and mentor, the aging alcoholic knight, John Falstaff (Joel Edgerton). Directed by David Michôd and co-written by Michôd and Edgerton, THE KING co-stars Sean Harris, Ben Mendelsohn, Robert Pattinson, and Lily-Rose Depp."
The Man Without Gravity- Netflix, November 1
Synopsis:
​"
A gravity-defying baby raised in seclusion matures into an extraordinary man -- and an international celebrity -- but longs for an ordinary life."
Into The Dark: Pilgrim- Hulu, November 1
Synopsis:
"
Inspired by true events, in an attempt to remind her family of their privilege and help them bond, Ms. Anna Barker invites Pilgrim re-enactors to stay with them over Thanksgiving. When the ‘actors’ refuse to break character, the Barker family learns that there is such a thing as too much gratitude."
Tom Clancy's Jack Ryan: Season Two- Amazon Prime, November 1
Synopsis:
​"
In the second season of Tom Clancy’s Jack Ryan, after tracking a potentially suspicious shipment of illegal arms in the Venezuelan jungle, CIA Officer Jack Ryan, portrayed by John Krasinski (A Quiet Place), heads down to South America to investigate. As Jack’s investigation threatens to uncover a far-reaching conspiracy, the President of Venezuela launches a counter-attack that hits home for Jack, leading him and his fellow operatives on a global mission spanning the United States, UK, Russia, and Venezuela to unravel the President’s nefarious plot and bring stability to a country on the brink of chaos."
The Irishman- In Theaters, November 1
Synopsis:
"
Robert De Niro, Al Pacino and Joe Pesci star in Martin Scorsese’s THE IRISHMAN, an epic saga of organized crime in post-war America told through the eyes of World War II veteran Frank Sheeran, a hustler and hitman who worked alongside some of the most notorious figures of the 20th century. Spanning decades, the film chronicles one of the greatest unsolved mysteries in American history, the disappearance of legendary union boss Jimmy Hoffa, and offers a monumental journey through the hidden corridors of organized crime: its inner workings, rivalries and connections to mainstream politics."
Terminator: Dark Fate- In Theaters, November 1
Synopsis:
​"
More than two decades have passed since Sarah Connor prevented Judgment Day, changed the future, and re-wrote the fate of the human race. Dani Ramos (Natalia Reyes) is living a simple life in Mexico City with her brother (Diego Boneta) and father when a highly advanced and deadly new Terminator – a Rev-9 (Gabriel Luna) – travels back through time to hunt and kill her. Dani’s survival depends on her joining forces with two warriors: Grace (Mackenzie Davis), an enhanced super-soldier from the future, and a battle-hardened Sarah Connor (Linda Hamilton). As the Rev-9 ruthlessly destroys everything and everyone in its path on the hunt for Dani, the three are led to a T-800 (Arnold Schwarzenegger) from Sarah’s past that may be their last best hope."
Light From Light- In Theaters, November 1
Synopsis:
"
Gifted with sometimes-prophetic dreams and a lifelong interest in the paranormal, Sheila (Marin Ireland) is asked to investigate a potential haunting at a Tennessee farmhouse. It’s there she meets Richard (Jim Gaffigan), a recent widower who believes his wife may still be with him. The investigation that ensues — which eventually pulls in Sheila’s son, Owen and his classmate Lucy — forces them to confront the mysteries of their own lives."
The End of the F***ing World- Netflix, November 4
Synopsis:
​"
Based on the award-winning series of comic books by Charles Forsman, this series invites viewers into the dark and confusing lives of teen outsiders James and Alyssa as they embark on a road trip to find Alyssa’s father, who left home when she was a child."
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